All is well…

All is well, or is it really?

How many times do we respond to others that all is well when it isn’t?

What keeps us from responding honestly, telling the hot-fire truth?

Do we feel as though our truthful response would put an undue burden on someone who has their own troubles, issues, or life circumstances?   

How will the other person feel about what we have to say?

Are we afraid of being labeled the whiner or the complainer?

Or do we feel shameful about telling the truth?

For many years I’ve practically applied vulnerability, authenticity, and transparency in life.  However, this year I realized that there were things in my life that I carried. These things became burdensome.

These things thwarted my ability to live completely well and whole.

I’ve decided instead of responding robotically, all is well when it isn’t, to tell the absolute truth, not the cotton candy-coated version with a smattering of truth, but the unadulterated truth.

I am certain of this…that in order to be delivered, completely healed, and transformed, a deeper version of my truths had to be told, to those that I kept the truth from, and to those I shared some semblance of truth.

Relationships, on every level, require honesty.

It’s impossible to help ourselves and others without sharing our life’s truths.

Community is built upon our ability to share the truth. And the truth requires vulnerability, authenticity, and transparency.

Q: All is well, or is it really? Can you relate, if so, how?

4 Comments

  1. Dear Joan — Thank you for reminding us of the power — and risk — of telling the “hot-fire truth” (great phrase) about ourselves. I”m definitely a person who will respond “fine” when asked how things are going. Maybe I’ll start unwinding more bits of truth from my coiled spool: high risk, high reward. Thanks for prompting me to dig deeper.

    In response to your question, I’ll share this story, which I blogged about recently. https://fashionedforjoy.com/2019/03/25/keeping-abreast-of-love/ . I told the truth when I didn’t want to, and good things happened. Keep writing and truth-telling! Your neighbor from FNF, Carol Ann

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Carol…Indeed, the higher the risk, the greater the reward. Deep calls unto deep. God calls us to join Him, in unchartered waters, when the shore is no where in sight. On the other side of every God-directed risk is God. Each time we choose to practically vulnerability, authenticity, and transparency we are digging deeper, drawing closer to Christ, as well as others. Thank you for stopping by and sharing your heart.

      Like

  2. I agree that we need to be more authentic. Years of pretending or denial can be very damaging. It’s not easy to be vulnerable or transparent to others especially upon being told pat answers in response.

    ~your FMF neighbor.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Such truth, Lee Ann. Denial is detrimental. Many times we wear masks to shield the shame. No, it’s not easy to be vulnerable and transparent, but it’s imperative that we do. It’s the only road to the freedom that Jesus has already guaranteed. And we need to be better in our responses to others, those pat answers leave us feeling worse than before we dared to share. We must choose to share anyway, not relying on the outcome of others. God sends those that will comfort and love us, unconditionally.

      Like

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